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Evanston IL Real Estate August 2018

Evanston IL Real Estate August 2018

We now have the Evanston IL Real Estate August 2018 report available for your viewing. The stats look good but still shows a seller’s market. The average price for houses has dropped very slightly. The chart at the end of this blog will be very helpful to further analysis the state of Evanston IL Real Estate.Evanston IL

Looking at the big picture shows a tiny gain of new listings as compared with one year ago this time. New listings for all types of properties are up.7%. Closed sales are up 4.4%. The change in inventory of all types of property is up 3.9%.

New listings of single-family homes in Evanston are up 14.1%. Under contract properties are up 9.1%. Closed sales are up 1.8%. The average sales price for an Evanston single family house is down by 1.6% to $559,000. The average market time before a contract is up 2.9% to 71 days. These are excellent figures.

Click Evanston IL houses for sale and Evanston IL condos for sale to see the latest and most accurate data. This comes directly from the Multiple Listing Service or MLS.

Evanston Condominiums are quite well too. New listings are down 9.8%. Under contract condos are down 9.3%. Closed sales are up 6.8%. The average sales price for an Evanston IL Condo is up 6.9% to $279,298. The average market time is up 43.5% to 66 days.

Evanston Il Map

This report is a look at a 30-day time frame ending September 14, 2018. We are comparing the data to the same time last year. This is a good way to judge who the Evanston IL Real Estate market is doing for consumers.

Evanston IL Real Estate August 2018

This report has come to you from Coldwell Banker Evanston. We would be happy to answer any of your real estate questions and enjoy helping first time buyers. You can reach us at (800) 858-7917 day or night.

Take a look at our website Coldwell Banker Evanston too. There is much you can learn about property and many questions will be answered for you.

Evanston IL Real Estate August 2018

Support and Advice for Exhausted Alzheimer’s Caregivers

Exercise Can Help Prevent Falls in the Senior Population

Exercise Can Help Prevent Falls in the Senior Population

Exercise Can Help Prevent Falls in the Senior Population

Image courtesy of Pixabay

Here is an article from our frequent guest blogger Claire Wentz. claire@caringfromafar.com

Many seniors experience debilitating injuries from falls every year, sometimes even resulting in death.  Exercise can play a vital role in preventing falls.  By incorporating fall prevention exercise options into seniors’ lifestyles, they can live fuller, healthier lives.

Scary statistics.  Falls are the most common cause of injury in older adults.  In fact, falls are the leading cause of senior deaths due to traumatic brain injury, and some researchers estimate up to half of senior falls result in injuries of some sort.  Many seniors break hips in falls, and 40% of those who do experience complications which lead to death, such as developing pneumonia while trying to recover from the fall.

Further implications.  According to some statistics, as many as 1 in 3 seniors experience falls each year.  Once an elderly person falls there is often a ripple effect.  Confidence and health can wane, with seniors reining in their activity levels out of fear of falling.  This can quickly lead to a reduced quality of life, including less independence, isolation, loneliness, and reduced exercise, which in turn can lead to less strength, more balance issues, and added health concerns.

Why do seniors fall?  There are several issues which contribute to the risk of falling, but the top concerns are simply slipping and tripping.  Due to failing balance, strength and perception, seniors are more inclined to become off-balance, and then to be unable to correct themselves as they fall.  In other words, when younger people slip they take a few steps and correct themselves, whereas catching themselves and becoming upright again isn’t typically an option for seniors due to their reduced capacities.  As Verywell Health points out, many times added to the situation are other issues such as arrhythmias or medications which can cause dizziness.  Altogether, there is a perfect storm.

Exercises that help.  Many seniors can benefit from the addition of fall prevention exercises.  Medicare.org recommends three categories of exercises which can help prevent falls:

  • Balance exercises. Balance training can strengthen the muscles that help seniors to remain stable.  Seniors at risk for falls should add 3 days per week of balance exercise training, in addition to a proven fitness program for fall prevention.  Balance exercises include things like standing on one foot for several seconds while holding a chair for balance, and walking heel-to-toe for 20 steps.
  • Step exercises. Participating in an aerobic step exercise program will strengthen leg muscles and encourage knee flexibility.  Participants should use a sturdy, broad, elevated step platform.  Exercises include stepping onto and off the platform during the workout routine.
  • Strength exercises. Enhancing strength is important for fall prevention so seniors are strong enough to catch themselves if they become off-balance.  Exercises can include resistance band training, weight training, or simple body weight resistance exercises.  Those with access to a gym or weight equipment can also use weight machines.

Easing into a program.  While many people believe physical complications leading to falls go hand-in-hand with old age, as explained by some professionals it’s possible for seniors to begin an exercise program to avoid that situation.  For seniors who never exercised before, adding a fitness program to their lives may seem overwhelming.  One suggestion is to focus on the casual and routine aspects of fall prevention exercises.  All of the primary exercises above can be performed in the comforts of home.  Some are subtle enough that seniors can do their exercises while engaging in other activities, such as washing dishes or standing in line at the grocery.  Seniors at risk for falls should be encouraged to perform the exercises as often as possible, making it a part of their daily lives.  Note that experts cited by AZCentral suggest discussing each individual situation with a physician before beginning an exercise program.

Exercise Can Help Prevent Falls in the Senior Population

Fall prevention is possible  Falls pose a serious threat to seniors.  Through balance, step and strength exercises, seniors can reduce their risk of injury and even death.  A simple, preventative fitness program can greatly increase quality of life for older adults.

Support and Advice for Exhausted Alzheimer’s Caregivers

Support and Advice for Exhausted Alzheimer’s Caregivers

Support and Advice for Exhausted Alzheimer’s Caregivers

This blog is another great piece by Claire Wentz

claire@caringfromafar.com

Support and Advice for Exhausted Alzheimer’s Caregivers

About Alzheimer’s Disease 

Image via Pexels

Alzheimer’s disease is a specific brain degenerative disorder with symptoms very similar to other types of dementia. The majority of people with Alzheimer’s are age 65 and older with mild symptoms appearing early and becoming progressively worse with time. The first changes in the brain can show up to 15 years before symptoms begin to show. From there, the disease progresses through several stages from moderate impairment to severe Alzheimer’s.

Early signs of Alzheimer’s include an inability to recall newly learned information, challenges in solving problems, difficulty completing familiar tasks, confusion with time or place, issues with spatial relationships, verbal problems, constantly misplacing things, poor judgment, withdrawal, and changes in mood or personality.

As Alzheimer’s progresses, other symptoms include:

  • Extreme memory loss
  • Rapid mood swings
  • Being haphazard with money
  • Lost perception of time
  • Increased problems with communication
  • Aimless wandering
  • Repetitive speech or actions
  • Inability to recognize loved ones
  • Loss of motor skills
  • Difficulty dressing oneself
  • Neglecting hygiene
  • Forgetting meals
  • Delusions or hallucinations
  • Acts of aggression or violence
  • Eventual loss of control over the body

Alzheimer’s Caretakers and Self-Care

 

As the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease progress, patients require round-the-clock care for their safety and wellbeing. Many people rely on friends and family to act as caregivers while dealing with their disease. Statistics from 2016 estimate 15.9 million people acted as Alzheimer’s caregivers for a loved one that year, ultimately providing at least 18.2 billion hours of unpaid work. Being an Alzheimer’s caregiver is particularly taxing and those who do it report substantial emotional, financial, and physical difficulties as a result — 35 percent say their health is in decline due to their responsibilities as caregiver.

About Alzheimer’s Disease

Alzheimer’s disease is a specific brain degenerative disorder with symptoms very similar to other types of dementia. The majority of people with Alzheimer’s are age 65 and older with mild symptoms appearing early and becoming progressively worse with time. The first changes in the brain can show up to 15 years before symptoms begin to show. From there, the disease progresses through several stages from moderate impairment to severe Alzheimer’s.

 

Early signs of Alzheimer’s include an inability to recall newly learned information, challenges in solving problems, difficulty completing familiar tasks, confusion with time or place, issues with spatial relationships, verbal problems, constantly misplacing things, poor judgment, withdrawal, and changes in mood or personality.

 

As Alzheimer’s progresses, other symptoms include:
  • Extreme memory loss
  • Rapid mood swings
  • Being haphazard with money
  • Lost perception of time
  • Increased problems with communication
  • Aimless wandering
  • Repetitive speech or actions
  • Inability to recognize loved ones
  • Loss of motor skills
  • Difficulty dressing oneself
  • Neglecting hygiene
  • Forgetting meals
  • Delusions or hallucinations
  • Acts of aggression or violence
  • Eventual loss of control over the body

Alzheimer’s Caretakers and Self-Care

As the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease progress, patients require round-the-clock care for their safety and wellbeing. Many people rely on friends and family to act as caregivers while dealing with their disease. Statistics from 2016 estimate 15.9 million people acted as Alzheimer’s caregivers for a loved one that year, ultimately providing at least 18.2 billion hours of unpaid work. Being an Alzheimer’s caregiver is particularly taxing and those who do it report substantial emotional, financial, and physical difficulties as a result — 35 percent say their health is in decline due to their responsibilities as caregiver.

Caring for a loved one with Alzheimer’s disease is a loyal and loving thing to do. However, if you are not properly caring for yourself, you can’t do your best job for the patient. It’s important to be proactive in practicing self-care to get through this difficult time.

Don’t Lose Hobbies or Interests

Whenever you have to dedicate your time to something like Alzheimer’s caregiving, it’s easy to dismiss hobbies and interests as a waste of time in comparison. However, keeping up with the things you love is just as important as anything else. You need that time to step away from the stresses of your situation and just do something for you.

Reach Out For Help

You never know if someone is able and willing to help unless you ask. You may be surprised which family members or friends have the time and resources available to help with your caregiving. Even if you don’t have family support, you deserve help in whatever form it comes. For instance, having a housekeeping service come and clean your place for you can lift a huge burden off your shoulders for just a few bucks. Most homeowners only have to spend between $122 to $167 to hire a maid service.

 

Apply for Financial Assistance

Caring for an Alzheimer’s patient can be incredibly expensive. Fortunately, there are resources available for caretakers to help fund things such as medical care and house modifications. It’s best to start contacting these agencies early to secure funding ahead of time before severe Alzheimer’s symptoms set it.

***

Alzheimer’s disease is a degenerative brain disorder that leaves people physically unable to care for themselves. A lot of the time, friends or family members step in as caregivers to assist the Alzheimer’s patient as they lose their faculties. This can be an incredibly taxing endeavor and it’s important for Alzheimer’s caregivers to remember their own needs as well as the patient’s.

Caring for a loved one with Alzheimer’s disease is a loyal and loving thing to do. However, if you are not properly caring for yourself, you can’t do your best job for the patient. It’s important to be proactive in practicing self-care to get through this difficult time.

Don’t Lose Hobbies or Interests

 

Whenever you have to dedicate your time to something like Alzheimer’s caregiving, it’s easy to dismiss hobbies and interests as a waste of time in comparison. However, keeping up with the things you love is just as important as anything else. You need that time to step away from the stresses of your situation and just do something for you.

 

Reach Out For Help

You never know if someone is able and willing to help unless you ask. You may be surprised which family members or friends have the time and resources available to help with your caregiving. Even if you don’t have family support, you deserve help in whatever form it comes. For instance, having a housekeeping service come and clean your place for you can lift a huge burden off your shoulders for just a few bucks. Most homeowners only have to spend between $122 to $167 to hire a maid service.

Apply for Financial Assistance

 

Caring for an Alzheimer’s patient can be incredibly expensive. Fortunately, there are resources available for caretakers to help fund things such as medical care and house modifications. It’s best to start contacting these agencies early to secure funding ahead of time before severe Alzheimer’s symptoms set it.

Support and Advice for Exhausted Alzheimer’s Caregivers

***

Alzheimer’s disease is a degenerative brain disorder that leaves people physically unable to care for themselves. A lot of the time, friends or family members step in as caregivers to assist the Alzheimer’s patient as they lose their faculties. This can be an incredibly taxing endeavor and it’s important for Alzheimer’s caregivers to remember their own needs as well as the patient’s.

House Hunting for Seniors

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