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Support and Advice for Exhausted Alzheimer’s Caregivers

Support and Advice for Exhausted Alzheimer’s Caregivers

This blog is another great piece by Claire Wentz

claire@caringfromafar.com

Support and Advice for Exhausted Alzheimer’s Caregivers

About Alzheimer’s Disease 

Image via Pexels

Alzheimer’s disease is a specific brain degenerative disorder with symptoms very similar to other types of dementia. The majority of people with Alzheimer’s are age 65 and older with mild symptoms appearing early and becoming progressively worse with time. The first changes in the brain can show up to 15 years before symptoms begin to show. From there, the disease progresses through several stages from moderate impairment to severe Alzheimer’s.

Early signs of Alzheimer’s include an inability to recall newly learned information, challenges in solving problems, difficulty completing familiar tasks, confusion with time or place, issues with spatial relationships, verbal problems, constantly misplacing things, poor judgment, withdrawal, and changes in mood or personality.

As Alzheimer’s progresses, other symptoms include:

  • Extreme memory loss
  • Rapid mood swings
  • Being haphazard with money
  • Lost perception of time
  • Increased problems with communication
  • Aimless wandering
  • Repetitive speech or actions
  • Inability to recognize loved ones
  • Loss of motor skills
  • Difficulty dressing oneself
  • Neglecting hygiene
  • Forgetting meals
  • Delusions or hallucinations
  • Acts of aggression or violence
  • Eventual loss of control over the body

Alzheimer’s Caretakers and Self-Care

 

As the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease progress, patients require round-the-clock care for their safety and wellbeing. Many people rely on friends and family to act as caregivers while dealing with their disease. Statistics from 2016 estimate 15.9 million people acted as Alzheimer’s caregivers for a loved one that year, ultimately providing at least 18.2 billion hours of unpaid work. Being an Alzheimer’s caregiver is particularly taxing and those who do it report substantial emotional, financial, and physical difficulties as a result — 35 percent say their health is in decline due to their responsibilities as caregiver.

About Alzheimer’s Disease

Alzheimer’s disease is a specific brain degenerative disorder with symptoms very similar to other types of dementia. The majority of people with Alzheimer’s are age 65 and older with mild symptoms appearing early and becoming progressively worse with time. The first changes in the brain can show up to 15 years before symptoms begin to show. From there, the disease progresses through several stages from moderate impairment to severe Alzheimer’s.

 

Early signs of Alzheimer’s include an inability to recall newly learned information, challenges in solving problems, difficulty completing familiar tasks, confusion with time or place, issues with spatial relationships, verbal problems, constantly misplacing things, poor judgment, withdrawal, and changes in mood or personality.

 

As Alzheimer’s progresses, other symptoms include:
  • Extreme memory loss
  • Rapid mood swings
  • Being haphazard with money
  • Lost perception of time
  • Increased problems with communication
  • Aimless wandering
  • Repetitive speech or actions
  • Inability to recognize loved ones
  • Loss of motor skills
  • Difficulty dressing oneself
  • Neglecting hygiene
  • Forgetting meals
  • Delusions or hallucinations
  • Acts of aggression or violence
  • Eventual loss of control over the body

Alzheimer’s Caretakers and Self-Care

As the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease progress, patients require round-the-clock care for their safety and wellbeing. Many people rely on friends and family to act as caregivers while dealing with their disease. Statistics from 2016 estimate 15.9 million people acted as Alzheimer’s caregivers for a loved one that year, ultimately providing at least 18.2 billion hours of unpaid work. Being an Alzheimer’s caregiver is particularly taxing and those who do it report substantial emotional, financial, and physical difficulties as a result — 35 percent say their health is in decline due to their responsibilities as caregiver.

Caring for a loved one with Alzheimer’s disease is a loyal and loving thing to do. However, if you are not properly caring for yourself, you can’t do your best job for the patient. It’s important to be proactive in practicing self-care to get through this difficult time.

Don’t Lose Hobbies or Interests

Whenever you have to dedicate your time to something like Alzheimer’s caregiving, it’s easy to dismiss hobbies and interests as a waste of time in comparison. However, keeping up with the things you love is just as important as anything else. You need that time to step away from the stresses of your situation and just do something for you.

Reach Out For Help

You never know if someone is able and willing to help unless you ask. You may be surprised which family members or friends have the time and resources available to help with your caregiving. Even if you don’t have family support, you deserve help in whatever form it comes. For instance, having a housekeeping service come and clean your place for you can lift a huge burden off your shoulders for just a few bucks. Most homeowners only have to spend between $122 to $167 to hire a maid service.

 

Apply for Financial Assistance

Caring for an Alzheimer’s patient can be incredibly expensive. Fortunately, there are resources available for caretakers to help fund things such as medical care and house modifications. It’s best to start contacting these agencies early to secure funding ahead of time before severe Alzheimer’s symptoms set it.

***

Alzheimer’s disease is a degenerative brain disorder that leaves people physically unable to care for themselves. A lot of the time, friends or family members step in as caregivers to assist the Alzheimer’s patient as they lose their faculties. This can be an incredibly taxing endeavor and it’s important for Alzheimer’s caregivers to remember their own needs as well as the patient’s.

Caring for a loved one with Alzheimer’s disease is a loyal and loving thing to do. However, if you are not properly caring for yourself, you can’t do your best job for the patient. It’s important to be proactive in practicing self-care to get through this difficult time.

Don’t Lose Hobbies or Interests

 

Whenever you have to dedicate your time to something like Alzheimer’s caregiving, it’s easy to dismiss hobbies and interests as a waste of time in comparison. However, keeping up with the things you love is just as important as anything else. You need that time to step away from the stresses of your situation and just do something for you.

 

Reach Out For Help

You never know if someone is able and willing to help unless you ask. You may be surprised which family members or friends have the time and resources available to help with your caregiving. Even if you don’t have family support, you deserve help in whatever form it comes. For instance, having a housekeeping service come and clean your place for you can lift a huge burden off your shoulders for just a few bucks. Most homeowners only have to spend between $122 to $167 to hire a maid service.

Apply for Financial Assistance

 

Caring for an Alzheimer’s patient can be incredibly expensive. Fortunately, there are resources available for caretakers to help fund things such as medical care and house modifications. It’s best to start contacting these agencies early to secure funding ahead of time before severe Alzheimer’s symptoms set it.

Support and Advice for Exhausted Alzheimer’s Caregivers

***

Alzheimer’s disease is a degenerative brain disorder that leaves people physically unable to care for themselves. A lot of the time, friends or family members step in as caregivers to assist the Alzheimer’s patient as they lose their faculties. This can be an incredibly taxing endeavor and it’s important for Alzheimer’s caregivers to remember their own needs as well as the patient’s.

House Hunting for Seniors

214 Pin Oak Dr Wilmette IL Sold

214 Pin Oak Dr Wilmette IL Sold

Friday 214 Pin Oak Dr Wilmette Sold. My clients the buyers were very pleased with their purchase. This is a truly beautiful home with every update a couple could ask for.

This home has 3 bedrooms and 2 and a half baths. it includes a one car attached garage and there is plenty of guest parking in this Wilmette IL location. The closing price was $399,000. We grabbed this town home, it was only on the market for 7 days. The next paragraph is how the listing broker described 214 Pin Oak.214 Pin Oak Dr Wilmette IL Sold

Lovely renovated 3 bedroom, 2.1 bath townhome in central Wilmette IL 60093. This beautiful home is all that you need. The gracious open floor plan lives like a single family home. Classic white kitchen with Carrara Marble counter tops and stainless steel appliances and breakfast bar for ease of family life and entertaining. The second floor boasts a generous master bedroom with full bath and walk in closet and two additional spacious bedrooms and full hall bath. The fully finished basement and laundry room add ease of daily life and relaxation. Storage abounds in this North Shore gem.

I liked her writing style, that is why I included it. Wilmette is a very popular location. Gilson Park beach is one of the favorite places to visit. A huge park is included with the lakefront that offers swimming, sailing and a harbor where people keep their larger crafts. I have been visiting Gilson since I was a kid.

214 Pin Oak Dr Wilmette IL Sold

We are Coldwell Banker Wilmette. You can find get your questions answered and get help on all of your Real Estate needs by giving us a call. We offer a toll free number for our out of state friends. That is (800) 858-7917.

Feel free to click this link to browse our website, Coldwell Banker Wilmette. This will provide you a direct to MLS page so you can search properties on your own.

Historic Plaza del Lago Shopping Center Sold

Chicago Summer Festival Guide 2018

Chicago Summer Festival Guide 2018

Chicago Summer Festival Guide 2018

We have so much going on in and around town. This is our opportunity to help you find exciting entertainment. Check out the Chicago Summer Festival Guide 2018. There is something for everyone.

It is the start of August and there is so much to do. You can enjoy outdoor concerts, art shows and check out the cultural celebrations Chicago is so well known for.

August 

Aug. 2-5: Lollapalooza (Loop) | Map

Aug. 2-5: Little Italy Fest-West (Addison) | Map

Aug. 3-5: Jeff Fest (Jefferson Park) | Map

Aug. 3-5: Destination Asia Festival (Lisle) | Map

Aug. 4: Rogers Pork Barbecue, Arts & Music Festival | Map

Aug. 4: Wheaton Brew Fest | Map

Aug. 4-5: Edge Fest (Edgewater) | Map

Aug. 4-5: Art at the Glen (Glenview) | Map

Aug. 4-5: Chicago Brewing District’s Dancing in the Streets (West Town) | Map

Continues through Aug. 25: Chicago SummerDance | Various locations

Continues through Aug. 18: Grant Park Music Festival (Loop) | Map

Continues through Aug. 16: Millennium Park Summer Music Series | Map

Continues through Aug. 30: Summer Concert Series (Lincoln Square) | Map

Aug. 8-26: Chicago Tribune FOOD BOWL | Various locations

Aug. 10-12: Chicago Hot Dog Fest (Lincoln Park) | Map

Aug. 10-12: Ginza Holiday Festival (Lincoln Park) | Map

Aug. 10-12: Retro on Roscoe (Roscoe Village) | Map

Aug. 10-12: Festival Cubano (Belmont Cragin) | Map

Aug. 11: Bud Billiken Parade (Bronzeville) | Map

Aug. 11-12: Northalsted Market Days (Lakeview) | Map

Aug. 11-12: Lincolnshire Art Festival | Map

Aug. 11-12: Near North Food Truck Social | Map

Aug. 11-12: Thirsty Ears Festival (Ravenswood) | Map

Aug. 11-12: My House Music Festival (Pilsen) | Map

Aug. 11-12: Arts at the Lake (Lake Zurich) | Map

Aug. 12: Slow & Low Chicago Lowrider Festival (Pilsen) | Map

Aug. 13: The Chicago Ice Cream Social (Near North Side) | Map

Aug. 16: Clark After Dark (Near North Side) | Map

Aug. 16-19: Little Italy Festa Taylor St. | Map

Aug. 16-18: Tastemaker Chicago (West Town) | Map

Aug. 17-19: Edison Park Fest | Map

Aug. 17-19: Glenwood Avenue Arts Fest (Rogers Park) | Map

Aug. 17-19: Evanston Art & Big Fork Festival | Map

Aug. 18-19: Chicago Air and Water Show (Near North Side) | Map

Aug. 18-19: Ukranian Days Festival (West Town) | Map

Aug. 18: Windy City West Indian Carnival (Hyde Park) | Map

Aug. 18: Oak Park Micro Brew Review | Map

Aug. 18: Homewood’s Giant Block Party | Map

Aug. 18-19: Sangria Festival (West Town) | Map

Aug. 18-19: Pilsen Fest | Map

Aug. 18-19: Vintage Days (Long Grove) | Map

Aug. 19: South Shore Summer Fest | Map

Aug. 19: Summer Smash (Douglas Park) | Map

Aug. 22-26: Will County Fair  (Peotone) | Map

Aug. 24-26: Taste of Greektown | Map

Aug. 24-26: Logan Square Food Truck Social | Map

Aug. 25-26: Port Clinton Art Festival (Highland Park) | Map

Aug. 25-26: Bucktown Art Fest | Map

Aug. 30-Sept. 2: Chicago Jazz Festival (Loop) | Map

Aug. 31-Sept. 2: NorthCoast Music Festival (West Town) | Map

Aug. 31-Sept. 2: Great American Lobster Fest (Near North Side) | Map

Aug. 31-Sept. 3: African Festival of the Arts (Washington Park) | Map

Aug. 31-Sept. 3: Taste of Polonia (Jefferson Park) | Map

September

Sept. 1-2: Fine Art Festival at Oakbrook Center | Map

Sept. 1-2: Deer Park Art Show | Map

Sept. 1-2: Cider & Sliders Festival (Lakeview) | Map

Sept. 1-3: Frankfort Fall Fest | Map

Sept. 1-3: Irish Days (Long Grove) | Map

Sept. 7: Windy City Wine Festival (Loop) | Map

Sept. 7-9: Throwback Music Fest (Norwood Park) | Map

Sept. 7-9: Festival de La Villita (Little Village) | Map

Sept. 7-9: German American Oktoberfest (Lincoln Square) | Map

Sept. 8-9: Renegade Craft Fair (Wicker Park) | Map

Sept. 7-23: World Music Festival | Various Locations

Sept. 8-9: Chicago Bourbon & Barbecue Festival (Roscoe Village) | Map

Sept. 8-9: Lakeview East Festival of the Arts | Map

Sept. 8-9: County Fair Chicago (Portage Park) | Map

Sept. 9-10: Ukrainian Village Fest | Map

Sept. 13-15: Chicago Turkish Festival (Loop) | Map 

Sept. 14-16: Riot Fest (Douglas Park) | Map

Sept. 14-16: Fulton Market Harvest Fest (West Town) | Map

Sept. 15: Independence Park Beer Fest (Irving Park) | Map

Sept. 15-16: Sam Adams Lakeview Taco Fest | Map

Sept. 15-16: Ravenswood Artwalk | Map

Sept. 15-16: Printers’ Row Art Fest | Map

Sept. 21-22: 312 Block Party (West Town) | Map

Sept. 21-23: Apple Fest (Long Grove) | Map

Sept. 22: Creative Youth Festival (Loop) | Map

Sept. 28-30: Oktoberfest Chicago (Lakeview) | Map

Sept. 28-30: Chicago Gourmet (Loop) | Map

Sept. 29-30: Hyde Park Jazz Festival | Map

Sept. 29-30: Edgewater Arts Festival | Map

Sept. 29-30: The Highwood Starving Artists Show | Map

Sept. 29-30: Chicago Japanese Matsuri (Near North Side) | Map

Chicago Summer Festival Guide 2018

Ravinia Festival 2018

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