Tag: real estate tips (page 1 of 34)

Mistakes you can make with a lowball offer

Yes, yes, I know.  It’s a buyers’ market.  So much inventory, low housing prices, so the buyer gets their pick at the price they want.  But not so fast.  Yes, lots of inventory, lower housing prices.  However, there is still power to negotiating.  And you don’t want to insult the seller with a lowball offer and lose your dream home because of it.  Here are some mistakes that can be made with a lowball offer:

1. Not knowing the market.  And each one is different.  What may be a more acceptable offer in one market won’t be the same in another.  There could be an area where sellers are pricing homes more aggressively; therefore, they’re sticking close to their asking price.  Another neighborhood might be mostly made up of foreclosures and short sales, so the bank wants to get rid of the home ASAP and are willing to accept less.  So you’ll need to do your research with the help of a qualified Realtor (see #2)

2. Not picking the right Realtor.  They have the experience and the background and know the area you’re looking to purchase, so they’re your best asset going into a negotiation.  But you have to make sure they’re solid negotiators, since they are working on your behalf.  They’re not going to tell you not to present a really low offer, but they might say the sellers will reject it offhand so you might want to consider raising it by X amount or offering to waive one of your contingencies.  Trust their advice.  You’re working as a team and you want to make sure your agent also has your best interests at heart.

3. Not knowing what you’re willing to pay.  A lot of people these days in this market are focused on getting the best price.  But you have to be careful.  You have to know what your limit is so you don’t overpay.  And sellers will know what they need to walk away from the closing table or they won’t be able to make the sale.  No matter how wonderful the home is and how perfect your furniture will look in it and that you can see yourself having your morning coffee on the deck overlooking the pond, there comes a point where no deal is worth it at a certain price. Know that before you start negotiating or you’ll let your emotions get the better of you.  

You can also lose your positioning power by being too hard a negotiator at the beginning.  Don’t make your first offer your final offer and then start negotiating.  The seller will know that you aren’t serious and has the ball back in their court.  Make your offer one that you’re willing to negotiate and have your Realtor tell the seller you want to work with them and make the deal happen.

This MSN article has a few more mistakes that can be made and how to avoid them.  My Web site has some other great articles and tips for buyers.  Have a great week!

Paint your home to sell

First things first.  You all know how important it is to keep your home in showing condition when you have your home on the market to sell.  No clutter, messes, dirty laundry, etc.  But it’s also important to make your home look the best it can in order to move quicker and to get you a good return on investment.  Paint color is key.  

Let’s start with what not to do.  No wallpaper.  I know it’s hard to remove.  I know it matches the bath towels that you special ordered along with the custom faucets.  But it just doesn’t work for most people.  And the buyers that want move-in ready homes don’t want to deal with it, either.  So if you have wallpaper, you’re probably going to benefit the most from this blog post.  I suggest removing it and painting.

No white paint.  This might sound surprising given that it’s neutral.  But having all white walls can make your house look very sterile and not lived in.  It also can appear too bright.  You do want to keep the colors neutral.  So if you’re going to be painting, I suggest light beige or light yellow.  

Don’t go crazy.  I am completely serious when I say that I’ve shown homes where one room is orange, another turquoise, another dark purple, etc.  It looks hideous.  If you have this in your home now and you are planning on selling, you’ll want to paint all the walls neutral to match.  And remember that dark colors make a room look a lot smaller.  So for those of you with navy blue bathrooms, now is the time to go neutral.

Here’s what does work.  Make sure that there are no noticeable scratches or marks on walls.  Touching up paint is very simple to do and can make a huge difference.  It shows buyers that your home is well maintained and cared for.  According to this AOL blog, “Karen Dembsky, president of Peachtree Home Staging LLC and Georgia’s Real Estate Staging Association, as well as a Pro Stager of the Year nominee, has the first and most important piece of advice before even tackling the issue of color.

‘A seller should always make sure that their paint has a fresh appeal, no dings, no marks. If there are any, it should be repainted or touched up because it gives the feeling of a well-maintained home,” she said. “The color has to be livable and appealing, you want a color where the buyer will come in and say that it’s not their first choice but they can live with it.'”

Dembsky suggests food-related colors for the kitchen, such as yellow, red, or orange.  But this is not permission to go out and paint your kitchen bright orange.  You still want to keep it soft and light.  She doesn’t recommend bright colors for the bedrooms because people view bedrooms as a place to sleep and relax, so light and neutral is best.  Dembsky recommends beige and light tan for bathroom walls.  If you’re dying for a bit of color, play it up with colored hand towels, bath mats, and fun soaps.  She does say that you can go for darker and richer colors in a home office, especially to play against a dark wood desk.

I’d love to hear your thoughts on this.  Please leave me a comment or visit my Web site.

Home improvements that turn off buyers

I’ve written multiple times on the home improvements that add the most value and the areas you want to focus on to attract buyers.  I found a great article on what could possibly turn buyers off, those improvements or features that might cause your home to sit on the market for a lot longer than you expected.  So if you do need to make one of these changes, consider your market and possibly try to convert it back prior to listing.  I’m focusing on a few that may affect more Chicagoland buyers.

1. Inserting a motorized stair lift.  Of course, this may be a necessary feature for someone who can no longer climb the stairs.  But for buyers that do have disabilities and are looking for a home, most buyers are looking for a ranch-style home, and they often search for homes that have a first floor master  bedroom and full bath.  You may also be competing with communities that specialize in low-maintenance living and those for ages 55 and over.

2. Converting a bedroom to a home office.  I’m not saying not to do it.  Trust me, I have one myself.  I’m saying that if you do, you could hurt your resale by not converting it back for showings.  If you have a 3-bedroom home and only 2 of your bedrooms look like bedrooms, many buyers may be turned off.  It’s best to put your desk and computer away and put a bed back in.  Now some people really upgrade a home office with flat-screen televisions, custom lighting, etc.  This would hurt your resale value a lot more, especially if it’s taking up a bedroom space.  If this is a location in an area of the basement that isn’t taking up a space meant for something else, you should be fine.

3. Converting a room to a hobby room.  This is a similar scenario to having an office in a bedroom.  I’ve come across lots of bedrooms that are now knitting rooms or scrapbooking rooms or pottery rooms.  Again, move that space somewhere like a basement, where it’s not taking up a bedroom.  Your home could sit on the market several months longer because of this.  

4. A home theater.  This I’ve seen quite often.  Oh, they’re nice features to have.  I’ve even seen mini movie theaters complete with theater chairs, popcorn machines, etc.  While it may not turn off a ton of buyers, it can put the home out of budget for many that weren’t expecting that feature to begin with.  You may price your home higher to recoup the $8,000-$15,000 it cost to install, but it will be hard to make that money back on a sale.

So if you are considering a major home improvement or upgrade, it’s best to consult with a Realtor prior to spending any money, just to get an opinion on resale value and how much you can expect to recoup when it is time to sell.  If you need to reach me, find me via my Web site.

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